Author Archives: C. DAY

Small Business Coronavirus Survival Resources.

https://www.usatoday.com/story/money/2020/03/23/coronavirus-gannett-website-help-small-businesses/2895481001/

Goldman Sachs predicts the economy will contract by an annual rate of 24% in the second quarter while JPMorgan Chase forecasts a 14% decline in output.  Restaurants, movie theaters and sports arenas aren’t the only businesses laying off employees and cutting hours as the coronavirus crushes the U.S. economy.

So are law firms, marketing companies, insurance providers and countless other enterprises that may seem insulated from the more direct body blows of an outbreak that has triggered the shutdown of public gathering spots across the country.

The vast majority of those affected are small businesses that lack the cash or credit lines that can prop up airlines and other large corporations for many months before they have to slash jobs. Firms with fewer than 500 employees make up 47% of private-sector payrolls, according to the Small Business and Entrepreneurship Council.

To be sure, restaurants, hotels, hair salons, stores and other consumer service providers are on the front lines of the economic meltdown as they lose the bulk of their sales, forcing them to abruptly lay off most or all employees. But those developments have reverberated across the economy in recent days, hammering the revenue of professional service businesses that sell to those restaurants and movie theaters, and creating a cloud of uncertainty that has chilled U.S. commerce broadly.

https://www.usatoday.com/videos/news/nation/2020/03/24/coronavirus-affecting-small-business-owners-los-angeles/645858000/


Financial resources for consumers

Communities continue to announce the temporary closure of businesses, schools and other public facilities or events. While these actions are necessary steps to help reduce exposures, it may bring financial uncertainty for many people who could experience a loss of income due to illness or workplace closures. If you are facing financial difficulties as a result of the pandemic, we have resources to protect and manage your finances.

  • Protect yourself financially – As Americans prepare for the possible spread of the coronavirus or COVID-19, here are resources to protect yourself financially. Read in English, Leer en Español (Updated 3/16/2020)
  • Consumer complaints – Since our inception, we’ve built a robust and technologically forward complaint process that handles approximately 30,000 complaints every month. Even in these challenging times, we are ready to send your complaints to companies to help you get the response you need. (Updated 3/17/2020)
  • Protecting your credit during the coronavirus pandemic – Your credit reports and scores play an important role in your future financial opportunities. Learn how to manage and protect your credit during the COVID-19 (coronavirus) pandemic. (Updated 3/19/2020)
  • Dealing with debt: Tips to help ease the impact – We have resources you can use to address issues related to debt collection during the coronavirus pandemic. (Updated 3/20/2020)
  • Tips for financial caregivers – We have resources for financial caregivers helping people who cannot manage their money or property themselves during the coronavirus pandemic.
  • (Updated 3/20/2020)
Veterans business specialist, the IVMF at Syracuse University’s
“TAKING CARE OF BUSINESS DURING A PANDEMIC”:
https://ivmf.syracuse.edu/taking-care-of-business-during-a-pandemic/

All employers need to consider how best to mitigate the spread of the virus and lower the impact of COVID-19 in their workplace. They should identify and communicate their specific intentions, which could include protecting people who are at higher risk for adverse health complications, maintaining business continuity, and minimizing adverse effects on other departments or organizations in your supply chains.

When reviewing your organization’s policies and procedures, it is important to think through the second-order effects as well. For example, a ban on travel without a solid work-from-home policy can make the office crowded, leading to higher risk of transmission, and, if you conduct business from multiple geographical locations, consider what impact the closure of one office has on the productivity of another.

Some of the key considerations when making decisions on appropriate responses are:

Tips to Prepare:

  • Have you written a business continuity plan? It’s not too late.
  • Virus severity (i.e., number of people who are sick, hospitalization and death rates) in the community where the business is located
  • Impact of virus on employees who are vulnerable and may be at higher risk for COVID-19 adverse health complications
  • Employers with 500 or fewer employees are to grant FMLA leave due to COVID-19 and up to two weeks of paid sick leave for absences related to COVID-19, as part of the new Families First Coronavirus Response Act federal legislation
  • Prepare for possible increased numbers of employee absences due to illness in employees and their family members, dismissals of early childhood programs and K-12 schools due to high levels of absenteeism or illness:
    • Employers should plan to monitor and respond to absenteeism at the workplace. Implement plans to continue your essential business functions.
    • Assess your essential functions and the reliance that others and the community have on your services or products. Be prepared to change your business practices if needed to maintain critical operations (e.g., identify alternative suppliers, prioritize customers, or temporarily suspend some of your operations if needed).
  • Do you know the rules around giving notice of COVID-19 exposure in the workplace and the sharing of medical information? Here is need-to-know data privacy information for reference.
  • Allow local leadership/management to have authority to take appropriate actions outlined in their business infectious disease response plan based on the condition in each locality.
  • Coordination with state and local health officials is strongly encouraged for all businesses so timely and accurate information can guide appropriate responses in each operational location
  • Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA) has additional tips for preparing your workspaces for COVID-19 (OSHA Standards for COVID-19and Preparing Workplaces for COVID-19)
F I N I S

CDC Guidance to Protect Your Business and Employees.

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/community/guidance-business-response.html?CDC_AA_refVal=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.cdc.gov%2Fcoronavirus%2F2019-ncov%2Fspecific-groups%2Fguidance-business-response.html%3Futm_medium%3Demail%26utm_source%3Dgovdelivery&utm_medium=email&utm_source=govdelivery              Site provides details for the following guidelines:

Actively encourage sick employees to stay home

Separate sick employees

Perform routine environmental cleaning

Advise employees before traveling to take certain steps

Planning for a Possible COVID-19 Outbreak in the US

The severity of illness or how many people will fall ill from COVID-19 is unknown at this time. If there is evidence of a COVID-19 outbreak in the U.S., employers should plan to be able to respond in a flexible way to varying levels of severity and be prepared to refine their business response plans as needed. For the general American public, such as workers in non-healthcare settings and where it is unlikely that work tasks create an increased risk of exposures to COVID-19, the immediate health risk from COVID-19 is considered low. The CDC and its partners will continue to monitor national and international data on the severity of illness caused by COVID-19, will disseminate the results of these ongoing surveillance assessments, and will make additional recommendations as needed.

  • Prepare for possible increased numbers of employee absences due to illness in employees and their family members, dismissals of early childhood programs and K-12 schools due to high levels of absenteeism or illness:
  • Employers should plan to monitor and respond to absenteeism at the workplace. Implement plans to continue your essential business functions in case you experience higher than usual absenteeism.
  • Cross-train personnel to perform essential functions so that the workplace is able to operate even if key staff members are absent.
  • Assess your essential functions and the reliance that others and the community have on your services or products. Be prepared to change your business practices if needed to maintain critical operations (e.g., identify alternative suppliers, prioritize customers, or temporarily suspend some of your operations if needed).
  • Identify possible work-related exposure and health risks to your employees. OSHA has more information on how to protect workers from potential exposuresexternal icon to COVID-19.
  • Engage stateexternal icon and localexternal icon health departments to confirm channels of communication and methods for dissemination of local outbreak information. When working with your local health department check their available hours.

Coronavirus, COVID-19 Website  – https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/index.html

SBA Economic Injury Disaster Loans

What businesses are eligible to apply?
SBA’s Economic Injury Disaster Loans (or working capital loans) are available to small businesses, small agricultural cooperatives, small aquaculture businesses and most private non-profit organizations in Georgia.
This includes:
  • Businesses directly affected by the disaster
  • Businesses that offer services directly related to the businesses in the declaration
  • Other businesses indirectly related the industry that are likely to be harmed by losses in their community (Example: Manufacturer of widgets may be eligible as well as the wholesaler and retailer of the product.)
What is the criteria for a loan approval?
  • Credit History-Applicants must have a credit history acceptable to SBA.
  • Repayment –SBA must determine that the applicant business has the ability to repay the SBA loan.
  • Eligibility- The applicant business must be physically located in a declared county and suffered working capital losses due to the declared disaster, not due to a downturn in the economy or other reasons
How much can I borrow?
  • Eligible entities may qualify for loans up to $2 million.
  • The interest rates for this disaster are 3.75 percent for small businesses and 2.75 percent for nonprofit organizations with terms up to 30 years.
  • Eligibility for these working capital loans are based on the size (must be a small business) and type of business and its financial resources.
How can I use the loan funds?
These working capital loans may be used to pay fixed debts, payroll, accounts payable, and other bills that could have been paid had the disaster not occurred. The loans are not intended to replace lost sales or profits or for expansion.
How to Apply
  • Applicants may apply online using the Electronic Loan Application (ELA) via SBA’s secure website at https://disasterloan.sba.gov/ela.
  • Paper loan applications can be downloaded from www.sba.gov/disaster. Completed applications should be mailed to: U.S. Small Business Administration, Processing and Disbursement Center, 14925 Kingsport Road, Fort Worth, TX 76155.
  • Disaster loan information and application forms may also be obtained by calling the SBA’s Customer Service Center at 800-659-2955 (800-877-8339 for the deaf and hard-of-hearing) or by sending an email to disastercustomerservice@sba.gov.
*Although a paper application and forms are acceptable, filing electronically is easier, faster and more accurate.
Other Facts:
  • SBA’s Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDLs) funds come directly from the U.S. Treasury.
  • Applicants do not go through a bank to apply. Instead apply directly to SBA’s Disaster Assistance Program at: DisasterLoan.sba.gov
  • There is no cost to apply.
  • There is no obligation to take the loan if offered.
  • The maximum unsecured loan amount is $25,000.
  • Applicants can have an existing SBA Disaster Loan and still qualify for an EIDL for this disaster, but the loans cannot be consolidated.
Basic Filing Requirements
  • Completed SBA loan application (SBA Form 5).
  • Tax Information Authorization (IRS Form 4506T) for the applicant, principals and affiliates.
  • Complete copies of the most recent Federal Income Tax Return.
  • Schedule of Liabilities (SBA Form 2202).
  • Personal Financial Statement (SBA Form 413).
Other information that may be requested:
  • Complete copy, including all schedules, of the most recent Federal income tax return for principals, general partners or managing member, and affiliates (see filing requirements for more information).
  • If the most recent Federal income tax return has not been filed, a year-end profit-and-loss statement and balance sheet for that tax year .
  • A current year-to-date profit-and-loss statement .
  • Additional Filing Requirements (SBA Form 1368) providing monthly sales figures. (This is especially important for Economic Injury Disaster Loans.)
In addition to the above, we suggest contacting your lending institution to see if relief programs are being offered during this time: delaying payments; interest only payments.
To learn more about the EIDL program:

Coronavirus Resources for Information

https://www.cdc.gov/media/dpk/diseases-and-conditions/coronavirus/coronavirus-2020.html

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/cases-updates/summary.html?CDC_AA_refVal=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.cdc.gov%2Fcoronavirus%2F2019-ncov%2Fsummary.html

 

 

 

 

 

Map updates:https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/cases-updates/cases-in-us.html


 

https://www.sba.gov/disaster-assistance/coronavirus-covid-19

The U.S. Small Business Administration is offering designated states and territories low-interest federal disaster loans for working capital to small businesses suffering substantial economic injury as a result of the Coronavirus (COVID-19). Upon a request received from a state’s or territory’s Governor, SBA will issue under its own authority, as provided by the Coronavirus Preparedness and Response Supplemental Appropriations Act that was recently signed by the President, an Economic Injury Disaster Loan declaration.


FEMA mobilizes to respond to coronavirus pandemic

Details about Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)* are changing rapidly and it’s easy to get information overload, but first responders need to be prepared to encounter cases. COVID-19 presents as a respiratory illness with mild to severe symptoms of fever, cough and shortness of breath. It is caused by the SARS-CoV-2 virus and spread via respiratory droplets with close contact, like the flu.

*https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/index.html

Coronavirus: make infection control a priority


Coronavirus: prevention guidelines

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/prepare/get-your-household-ready-for-COVID-19.html

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/prepare/prevention.html

 Copied from a health worker…

Best explanation I have read about the corona virus: Feeling confused as to why Coronavirus is a bigger deal than Seasonal flu? Here it is in a nutshell. I hope this helps. Feel free to share this to others who don’t understand…

It has to do with RNA sequencing … genetics.

Seasonal flu is an “all human virus”. The DNA/RNA chains that make up the virus are recognized by the human immune system. This means that your body has some immunity to it before it comes around each year… you get immunity two ways…through exposure to a virus, or by getting a flu shot.

Novel viruses, come from animals…. the WHO tracks novel viruses in animals, (sometimes for years watching for mutations). Usually these viruses only transfer from animal to animal (pigs in the case of H1N1) (birds in the case of the Spanish flu). But once, one of these animal viruses mutates, and starts to transfer from animals to humans… then it’s a problem, Why? Because we have no natural or acquired immunity.. the RNA sequencing of the genes inside the virus isn’t human, and the human immune system doesn’t recognize it so, we can’t fight it off.

Now…. sometimes, the mutation only allows transfer from animal to human, for years it’s only transmission is from an infected animal to a human before it finally mutates so that it can now transfer human to human… once that happens..we have a new contagion phase. And depending on the fashion of this new mutation, thats what decides how contagious, or how deadly it’s gonna be..

H1N1 was deadly….but it did not mutate in a way that was as deadly as the Spanish flu. It’s RNA was slower to mutate and it attacked its host differently, too.

Fast forward.

Now, here comes this Coronavirus… it existed in animals only, for nobody knows how long…but one day, at an animal market, in Wuhan China, in December 2019, it mutated and made the jump from animal to people. At first, only animals could give it to a person… But here is the scary part…. in just TWO WEEKS it mutated again and gained the ability to jump from human to human. Scientists call this quick ability, “slippery”

This Coronavirus, not being in any form a “human” virus (whereas we would all have some natural or acquired immunity). Took off like a rocket. And this was because, Humans have no known immunity…doctors have no known medicines for it.

And it just so happens that this particular mutated animal virus, changed itself in such a way the way that it causes great damage to human lungs..

That’s why Coronavirus is different from seasonal flu, or H1N1 or any other type of influenza…. this one is slippery AF. And it’s a lung eater…And, it’s already mutated AGAIN, so that we now have two strains to deal with, strain s, and strain L….which makes it twice as hard to develop a vaccine.

We really have no tools in our shed, with this. History has shown that fast and immediate closings of public places has helped in the past pandemics. Philadelphia and Baltimore were reluctant to close events in 1918 and they were the hardest hit in the US during the Spanish Flu.

Factoid: Henry VIII stayed in his room and allowed no one near him, till the Black Plague passed…(honestly…I understand him so much better now). Just like us, he had no tools in his shed, except social isolation…

And let me end by saying….right now it’s hitting older folks harder… but this genome is so slippery…if it mutates again (and it will). Who is to say, what it will do next.

Be smart folks… acting like you’re unafraid is so not sexy right now.

Don’t Let Virus Sicken Your Small Business

Courtesy USA Today 3/12/2020 Money section, page 3B, article by Rhonda Abrams

Six recommendations for small businesses:  (1) Find alternatives (work from home, use phone calls, Skype), (2) Travel, but take precautions (wipe down areas on plane with antiseptics), (3) Don’t force employees to travel (be responsive to their concerns, (4) Business interruption insurance (big conferences which had to cancel probably had it, but check your own coverage, and (5) Provide paid sick leave (help sick employees stay home).

COVID-19: Implications for Business

There’s a great deal of uncertainty around the next phases of the coronavirus outbreak—a human tragedy. The prevalent narrative, focused on pandemic, underweights the possibility of a more optimistic outcome. As we monitor developments, this briefing highlights what we do and do not know, outlines potential economic scenarios, and discusses how businesses can act now.

Less than ten weeks have passed since China reported the existence of a new virus to the World Health Organization. This virus, now known as SARS-CoV-2, causing COVID-19 disease, spread quickly in the city of Wuhan and throughout China. The country has experienced a deep humanitarian challenge, with more than 80,000 cases and more than 3,000 deaths. COVID-19 progressed quickly beyond China’s borders. Four other major transmission complexes are now established across the world: East Asia (especially South Korea, with more than 7,000 cases, as well as Singapore and Japan), the Middle East (centered in Iran, with more than 6,500 cases), Europe (especially the Lombardy region in northern Italy, with more than 7,300 cases, but with widespread transmission across the continent), and the United States, with more than 200 cases. Each of these transmission complexes has sprung up in a region where millions of people travel every day for social and economic reasons, making it difficult to prevent the spread of the disease. In addition to these major complexes, many other countries have been affected. Exhibit 1 offers a snapshot of the current progress of the disease and its economic impact.

The next phases of the outbreak are profoundly uncertain. In our view, the prevalent narrative, focused on pandemic, to which both markets and policy makers have gravitated as they respond to the virus, is possible but underweights the possibility of a more optimistic outcome. In this briefing note, we attempt to distinguish the things we know from those we don’t, and the potential implications of both sets of factors. We then outline three potential economic scenarios, to illustrate the range of possibilities, and conclude with some discussion of the implications for companies’ supply chains, and seven steps businesses can take now to prepare.

Our perspective is based on our analysis of past emergencies and on our industry expertise. It is only one view, however. Others could review the same facts and emerge with a different view. Our scenarios should be considered only as three among many possibilities. This perspective is current as of March 9, 2020. We will update it regularly as the outbreak evolves.

When Pundits Say That Robots WIll Take Our Jobs, Remember These 4 Things

A 2019 study by the Brookings Institution found that over 61% of jobs will be affected by automation. That comes on the heels of a 2017 report from the McKinsey Global Institute that found that 51% of total working hours and $2.7 trillion dollars in wages are highly susceptible to automation and a 2013 Oxford study that found 47% of jobs will be replaced.

The future looks pretty grim indeed until you start looking at jobs that have already been automated. Fly-by-wire was introduced in 1968, but today we’re facing a massive pilot shortage. The number of bank tellers has doubled since ATMs were introduced. Overall, the US is facing a massive labor shortage.

In fact, although the workforce has doubled since 1970, labor participation rates have risen by more than 10% since then. Everywhere you look, as automation increases, so does the demand for skilled humans. So the challenge ahead isn’t so much finding work for humans, but to prepare humans to do the types of work that will be in demand in the years to come.

1. Automation Doesn’t Replace Jobs, It Replaces Tasks

To understand the disconnect between all the studies that seem to be predicting the elimination of jobs and the increasingly dire labor shortage, it helps to look a little deeper at what those studies are actually measuring. The truth is that they don’t actually look at the rate of jobs being created or lost, but tasks that are being automated. That’s something very different.

To understand why, consider the legal industry, which is rapidly being automated. Basic activities like legal discovery are now largely done by algorithms. Services like LegalZoomautomate basic filings. There are even artificial intelligence systems that can predict the outcome of a court case better than a human can.

So it shouldn’t be surprising that many experts predict gloomy days ahead for lawyers. Yet the number of lawyers in the US has increased by 15% since 2008 and it’s not hard to see why. People don’t hire lawyers for their ability to hire cheap associates to do discovery, file basic documents or even, for the most part, to go to trial. In large part, they want someone they can trust to advise them.

In a similar way we don’t expect bank tellers to process transactions any more, but to help us with things that we can’t do at an ATM. As the retail sector becomes more automated, demand for e-commerce workers is booming. Go to a highly automated Apple Store and you’ll find far more workers than at a traditional store, but we expect them to do more than just ring us up.

2. When Tasks Become Automated, The Become Commoditized

Let’s think back to what a traditional bank looked like before ATMs or the Internet. In a typical branch, you would see a long row of tellers there to process deposits and withdrawals. Often, especially on Fridays when workers typically got paid, you would expect to see long lines of people waiting to be served.

In those days, tellers needed to process transactions quickly or the people waiting in line would get annoyed. Good service was fast service. If a bank had slow tellers, people would leave and go to one where the lines moved faster. So training tellers to process transactions efficiently was a key competitive trait.

Today, however, nobody waits in line at the bank because processing transactions is highly automated. Our paychecks are usually sent electronically. We can pay bills online and get cash from an ATM. What’s more, these aren’t considered competitive traits, but commodity services. We expect them as a basic requisite of doing business.

In the same way, we don’t expect real estate agents to find us a house or travel agents to book us a flight or find us a hotel room. These are things that we used to happily pay for, but today we expect something more.

3. When Things Become Commodities, Value Shifts Elsewhere

In 1900, 30 million people in the United States were farmers, but by 1990 that number had fallen to under 3 million even as the population more than tripled. So, in a manner of speaking, 90% of American agriculture workers lost their jobs, mostly due to automation. Still, the twentieth century became an era of unprecedented prosperity.

We’re in the midst of a similar transformation today. Just as our ancestors toiled in the fields, many of us today spend much of our time doing rote, routine tasks. However, as two economists from MIT explain in a paper, the jobs of the future are not white collar or blue collar, but those focused on non-routine tasks, especially those that involve other humans.

Consider the case of bookstores. Clearly, by automating the book buying process, Amazon disrupted superstore book retailers like Barnes & Noble and Borders. Borders filed for bankruptcy in 2011 and was liquidated later that same year. Barnes & Noble managed to survive, but has been declining for years.

Yet a study at Harvard Business School found that small independent bookstores are thriving by adding value elsewhere, such as providing community events, curating titles and offering personal recommendations to customers. These are things that are hard to do well at a big box retailer and virtually impossible to do online.

4. Value Is Shifting From Cognitive Skills To Social Skills

20 or 30 years ago, the world was very different. High value work generally involved retaining information and manipulating numbers. Perhaps not surprisingly, education and corporate training programs were focused on teaching those skills and people would build their careers on performing well on knowledge and quantitative tasks.

Today, however, an average teenager has more access to information and computing power than a typical large enterprise had a generation ago, so knowledge retention and quantitative ability have largely been automated and devalued. High value work has shifted from cognitive skills to social skills.

Consider that the journal Nature has found that the average scientific paper today has four times as many authors as one did in 1950 and the work they are doing is far more interdisciplinary and done at greater distances than in the past. So even in highly technical areas, the ability to communicate and collaborate effectively is becoming an important skill.

There are some things that a machine will never do. Machines will never strike out at a Little League game, have their hearts broken or see their children born. That makes it difficult, if not impossible, for machines to relate to humans as well as a human can. The future of work is humans collaborating with other humans to design work for machines.

Courtesy Digital Tonto by Greg Satell March 8, 2020

NAVY SEAL Develops an MVP from Parachute Webbing and a Jiu-Jitsu Belt!

While on deployment in 1997, Navy SEAL Squadron Commander Randy Hetrick was looking for a way to keep his body in peak physical condition, which is essential for effectively operating as a member of the most elite fighting force on the planet. Alas, there weren’t many Equinoxes or L.A. Fitnesses in the part of the world he was deployed in (okay, there weren’t any).

The ability to adapt and improvise are trademarks of special operators, and so Hetrick put those powers to work. Using only parachute webbing, a jiu-jitsu belt he accidentally packed in his bag and his body weight, Hetrick devised a workout system that helped keep his mind and body strong. It was primitive, and it worked. After leaving the Navy, Hetrick continued to develop and refine his MacGyver-ed system. Cut to 2019, and that system is now the global fitness phenomenon known as TRX. Hetrick’s suspension-training product and workout system are utilized in more than 60,000 clubs and training facilities worldwide, the company expects to sell more than $60 million in goods and services this coming year and has a roster of ambassadors including Super Bowl-winning quarterback Drew Brees. Not too shabby, right?

Prior to our conversation, I took a class in New York City as part of the “TRX for AnyBODY” campaign, which launched to encourage non-elite athletes (like me) to give it a shot. Afterward, I spoke with Randy in-between gasping for air. Here are some of the highights of that conversation:

What the military teaches you about risk

“The SEAL Teams taught me several useful lessons about risk: 1. Every real opportunity entails risk and most risks contain opportunity. 2. Risk is a thing that can be managed through preparation and adherence to a set of standard operating procedures (SOPs) that distill generations of institutional knowledge into modern-day best practices. Bottom line: Blind risk is bad, managed risk is the name of the game.”

Related: 3 Tips Navy SEALs Offer That Every Entrepreneur Can Use

Success starts and ends with teamwork

“The central tenet of special operations is that small groups of talented, motivated individuals with complementary skillsets — aligned around a common mission — can form teams that make even the impossible possible. The key ingredients are talent, motivation, dedication, complementary skillsets and team alignment.”

What veterans bring to the table in business

“In the SEAL Teams, the two most important character traits are integrity and accountability. In my 15 years as an entrepreneur, I have found that to be true in the business world as well. Virtually all other skills can be taught, but integrity and accountability are difficult to teach to an employee who doesn’t understand or appreciate those traits by the time he’s reached adulthood. Military veterans are steeped in these concepts from the day they enter service. And during the course of a service member’s career, he or she also develops resourcefulness, tenacity and selfless dedication to the mission — above all else. If you want a well-trained, high-integrity individual who craves accountability and is steeped in a tradition of selflessness, service, and resourcefulness … you can’t do better than to hire a veteran.”

Related: What Is Leadership? The Navy SEAL Who Killed Osama Bin Laden Answers.

His proudest moment as a Navy SEAL

“Being entrusted to command a squadron of the most elite special operators that ever walked the face of the Earth. For that brief moment in time, I had reached the absolute pinnacle of my profession. And it was, at that time, the greatest achievement of my life.”

His proudest moment in business

“I’ve had many, many proud moments working with my teams to build TRX into the amazing, global brand that it has become.  But maybe the proudest of all was the day that a young blind man —  a former SEAL who had been blinded in combat — told me that TRX had saved his life. When I asked what he meant, he explained that we had given him a tool and the knowledge to train himself, without any assistance from anyone, which had given him back one of the most important things in life … his independence.”

Related: Former Navy SEALs Jocko Willink and Leif Babin Say Leaders Routinely Make These 2 Mistakes

TRX for Anybody

“Even as TRX brings new products and services to serve its professional clientele of trainers, clubs and athletes, it is also expanding its scope in the consumer landscape as well. Our customer base is 50/50 male to female and spans ages from 15 to 95. TRX is, indeed, for everybody. But that reality has been, until recently, our best-kept secret. So we recently decided to broaden our marketing message and spread the word that whoever you are, whatever your goals, and whatever your level of fitness, TRX is for you. We launched our ‘TRX for AnyBODY’ campaign to help share the amazing stories of inspiration, courage and success that are a daily part of our lives and our brand at TRX. And we hope to encourage everyone, everywhere who has a body to let TRX help them achieve their best, whatever that best might be.”

Article from Entreprenur.com.

Every Truth Is But A Half Truth

As much as I love self-improvement and sharing it with others, I always . Nothing is straightforward. Every important truth is a paradox.

If you want to be successful, you need to be comfortable with holding contradictory thoughts in your mind at the same time.

Most people can’t do this. They crave binary, black and white, either-or thinking. Either you’re on their team or not, agree with them or you’re stupid and evil, toe the line or get ostracized.

Well, you don’t need me to tell you how dumb this is because you already know. Even the people who do it, even if you do it, deep down, you know.

Deep down, you know the paradoxical truths that lead to living a successful life, but how do you bring yourself to act on the information?

I use the same process over and over to :

  • Brainwash yourself to undo your binary societal programming. This means reading, studying alternative media sources, watching videos, whatever you gotta do
  • Implement. Unless you test the theories you learn in self-improvement, none of the lessons will have an impact on you. Agree or disagree with a piece of advice? Go and see for yourself.
  • Constantly question your thoughts and results; iterate. You should never be quite sure you’re 100 percent right. It makes no sense to guarantee anything in a world with so many variables. Attempt to be less wrong, not right.

Using this process, especially when it comes to the paradoxes of life I’m going to share with you, can and likely will lead to a better life.

Use These Extreme and Opposite Personality Traits

“[On what makes people successful] The first is a superiority complex — a deep-seated belief in their exceptionality. The second appears to be the opposite — insecurity, a feeling that you or what you’ve done isn’t good enough. The third is impulse control.” — Sam Ovens.

You need a delusional level of optimism to counteract all of the negativity, limiting beliefs, and .

The masses aren’t at fault. Honestly, the inevitable outcome of decades of brainwashing, political psyops and institutional mass conditioning based on perverse incentives is the vast majority of people living well below their potential and infecting you with that energy on accident.

Said better: don’t be mad at society, don’t look at other inherently worthy people as sheep, just understand what’s going on and prepare your mental defences against it.

If mediocrity is the norm, you have to think of yourself as exceptional.

You have to be audacious and borderline arrogant to believe that, somehow, little old you is going to be the one to break out of the system and live life on your own terms. You need balls, courage, moxie, a chip on your shoulder, whatever you need to navigate that minefield of achieving your purpose.

Then, at the same time, you should think of yourself as a worm loser nobody that has a ton of work to do in order to get better. See, most people do get the first part right… kind of.

We all have fantasies about being our super self-actualized self. We are arrogant. Even if we never do anything with our daydreams, we have them all the time and fancy ourselves better than the average person.

But, to be successful, you must escape “Potentialville.”

When you try to develop a skill, you’ll be confronted with feedback about . It takes humility to admit you don’t know all that much and need to get better. It takes real courage to take genuine criticism and use it to improve.

There is a healthy form of self-doubt. This form pushes you to get better for the sake of getting better instead of egotistical reasons.


Your Purpose Means Everything and Nothing At the Same Time

The meaning of life is just to be alive. It is so plain and so obvious and so simple. And yet, everybody rushes around in a great panic as if it were necessary to achieve something beyond themselves.” — Alan Watts

On one hand, in the eyes of the universe, you’re already dead. Nothingmatters.

You shouldn’t care about success at all because success is just a figment of your imagination that mostly serves your ego and causes pain when you don’t get what you want.

All of these statements are…half true.

On the other hand, your life should matter to you — a ton. . As vast as the universe is, you look at yourself as the centre of it, and you will feel the triumph or regret of the path you choose before you die.

So what’s the answer? Detachment.

You can work extremely hard on developing skills, a career, a business, relationships, the perfect body, whatever it is that you want, 

Most people make the mistake of taking their life seriously and living below their potential — what a tragic combo.

I live life like a game that I’m trying to win, but I remember that it’s just a game. Because nothing matters, I treat life like everything matters.


Use These Extreme and Opposite Personality Traits

“[On what makes people successful] The first is a superiority complex — a deep-seated belief in their exceptionality. The second appears to be the opposite — insecurity, a feeling that you or what you’ve done isn’t good enough. The third is impulse control.” — Sam Ovens.

You need a delusional level of optimism to counteract all of the negativity, limiting beliefs, and .

The masses aren’t at fault. Honestly, the inevitable outcome of decades of brainwashing, political psyops and institutional mass conditioning based on perverse incentives is the vast majority of people living well below their potential and infecting you with that energy on accident.

Said better: don’t be mad at society, don’t look at other inherently worthy people as sheep, just understand what’s going on and prepare your mental defences against it.

If mediocrity is the norm, you have to think of yourself as exceptional.

You have to be audacious and borderline arrogant to believe that, somehow, little old you is going to be the one to break out of the system and live life on your own terms. You need balls, courage, moxie, a chip on your shoulder, whatever you need to navigate that minefield of achieving your purpose.

Then, at the same time, you should think of yourself as a worm loser nobody that has a ton of work to do in order to get better. See, most people do get the first part right… kind of.

We all have fantasies about being our super self-actualized self. We are arrogant. Even if we never do anything with our daydreams, we have them all the time and fancy ourselves better than the average person.

But, to be successful, you must escape “Potentialville.”

When you try to develop a skill, you’ll be confronted with feedback about . It takes humility to admit you don’t know all that much and need to get better. It takes real courage to take genuine criticism and use it to improve.

There is a healthy form of self-doubt. This form pushes you to get better for the sake of getting better instead of egotistical reasons.

From Daily Medium’s Mind Cafe by Ayodeji Awosika 1/20/20, “5 Paradoxes of Life You Must Embrace If You Want To Be Successful.”