Author Archives: C. DAY

AI Will Put 10 Million Jobs at High Risk.

Research Brief: AI Will Put 10 Million Jobs At High Risk — More Than Were Eliminated By The Great Recession.  Gig Economy Here.

A Day in the Life as an Entrepreneur.

It all looks so easy, doesn’t it? Well, let me let you in on a secret. It can actually be really hard, stressful and exhausting.  But, being an entrepreneur can also be incredibly liberating, exhilarating and unbelievably rewarding. Now here’s the thing. Most of the time, it’s all of these things (and so many more) at the same time and often all on the same day.

From failure to million-dollar business. Current in Entrepreneurship.

Derek understands how difficult it can be as an entrepreneur because he didn’t just rise to success on a linear path. In fact, it was quite the opposite, as he points to the critical role that failure played in building a million-dollar business.

Halpern started his first blog after accidentally clicking on someone else’s site and realizing he could get paid by advertisers. He figured this would be an easy way to make money. He was wrong. It bombed.

Then he accidentally clicked on another blog and decided he’d try again…this time “making fun of celebrities instead of sharing the dumb things he did in college.

He was right. It worked. He was starting to climb the ladder of success that everyone dreams of.

And while he was suddenly doing better than he’d ever had, he still struggled from time to time, like when he decided to run his blog and hold a corporate job, which went great until he got a mediocre review, starting a downward spiral of hating himself and “drinking too much.” Or when he decided to launch a website for conferences and speakers, working on it for months before realizing that others were doing the same — and failing.

In a 2015 interview with Halpern, Tim Ferriss, author of “The 4-Hour Workweek” shared how, at one point, he was so down that he actually considered suicide.

Fortunately he didn’t, and he learned something very important from that time in his life: neither ups nor downs are permanent.

In other words, when you’re up, enjoy it because it’s not going to last forever. Soak it in, revel in it, bask in its glory.

And if you’re down, remember that relief is ahead because you can’t stay down forever either.

Or, as Tim says, it’s about “…realizing that there is no darkness without the light, that the light can come afterwards. And it does always come afterwards.”

This is critical because entrepreneurship and depression often go hand-in-hand.

Current in Entrepreneurship.

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Global C. E. O. Conference in Tampa Oct. 26-28th

Current in Entrepreneurship  Conference and Pitch Competition       

Entrepreneurship as a field of study at colleges and universities across the U.S. and around the world has become a leading subject at the undergraduate and graduate level. With this increased attention, it is more important than ever to give students the opportunities to network not only with their student peers, but with fellow entrepreneurs in the business world to promote entrepreneurship at all levels and in all environments. And, this is CEO.

 

 

Entrepreneurship as a field of study at colleges and universities across the U.S. and around the world has become a leading subject at the undergraduate and graduate level. According to the 2011 Global Entrepreneurship Monitor (GEM) U.S. Report, younger adults (18-24 years old) are more likely to start a business, and college graduates or those pursuing higher education are particularly more included to pursue entrepreneurship. With this increased attention, it is more important than ever to give students the opportunities to network not only with their student peers, but with fellow entrepreneurs in the business world to promote entrepreneurship at all levels and in all environments. Collegiate Entrepreneurs’ Organization (CEO) is the premier entrepreneurship network with chapters on university campuses across North America and beyond. CEO currently supports entrepreneurship in over 250 chapters in all 50 states and worldwide.

Each year, CEO sponsors an informative, action packed national conference that attracts nearly 1,500 collegiate level students (and their faculty advisors) from around the United States. During the three-day conference, attendees network with other entrepreneurial-minded students and listen to presentations from seasoned and nascent entrepreneurs, business owners, subject matter experts, motivational speakers and fellow students who are making the transition from dreamers to doers.

Current in Entrepreneurship

 

Premier Entrepreneurship Podcast.

Current in Entrepreneurship – Thanks to Doan Winkel, an active entrepreneurship faculty chair, USASBE is launching what will be a terrific resource for entrepreneurs and entrepreneurship educators. Called USASBE Teaching Tuesday, Doan will interview a prominent entrepreneurship person to share tips for a more engaging classroom.  To start with he will interview the current USASBE President and Timmons Chair of Entrepreneurship at Babson College, Dr. Heidi Neck.

Heidi Neck, Ph.D., is a Babson College Professor and the Jeffry A. Timmons Professor of Entrepreneurial Studies. She teaches entrepreneurship at the MBA and executive levels. Her research interests include entrepreneurship education, entrepreneurship inside organizations, and creative thinking. Neck is the lead author of Teaching Entrepreneurship: A Practice-Based Approach–a book written to help educators teach entrepreneurship in more experiential and engaging ways.

To access the U. S. Association of Small Business and Entrepreneurship organization go to – http://www.usasbe.org, and to access the podcast on iTunes go to – https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/usasbe-teaching-tuesdays/id1286450772?mt=2.

Current in Entrepreneurship.

 

Peak Productivity, The Ivy Lee Method.

What is current in entrepreneurship?
Managing Priorities Well

 

In my book Set Your Own Salary*, I detail the point at which I was overwhelmed with demands in my first startup insurance business.  Closing the office to go to the Jacksonville FL Southside library, I took ten books about time management off the shelf.  The single, most powerful change I made was this Ivy Lee Method, which single handedly made me successful.

By 1918, Charles M. Schwab was one of the richest men in the world. Schwab was the president of the Bethlehem Steel Corporation, the largest shipbuilder and the second-largest steel producer in America at the time. The famous inventor Thomas Edison once referred to Schwab as the “master hustler.” He was constantly seeking an edge over the competition.

One day in 1918, in his quest to increase the efficiency of his team and discover better ways to get things done, Schwab arranged a meeting with a highly-respected productivity consultant named Ivy Lee. Lee was a successful businessman in his own right and is widely remembered as a pioneer in the field of public relations. As the story goes, Schwab brought Lee into his office and said, “Show me a way to get more things done.”

“Give me 15 minutes with each of your executives,” Lee replied. “How much will it cost me,” Schwab asked. “Nothing,” Lee said. “Unless it works. After three months, you can send me a check for whatever you feel it’s worth to you.”

The Ivy Lee Method During his 15 minutes with each executive, Lee explained his simple method for achieving peak productivity:

  1. At the end of each work day, write down the six most important things you need to accomplish tomorrow. Do not write down more than six tasks.
  2. Prioritize those six items in order of their true importance.
  3. When you arrive tomorrow, concentrate only on the first task. Work until the first task is finished before moving on to the second task.
  4. Approach the rest of your list in the same fashion. At the end of the day, move any unfinished items to a new list of six tasks for the following day.
  5. Repeat this process every working day.

The strategy sounded simple, but Schwab and his executive team at Bethlehem Steel gave it a try. After three months, Schwab was so delighted with the progress his company had made that he called Lee into his office and wrote him a check for $25,000.A $25,000 check written in 1918 is the equivalent of a $400,000 check in 2015.

The Ivy Lee Method of prioritizing your to-do list seems stupidly simple. How could something this simple be worth so much? What makes it so effective?

On Managing Priorities Well  Ivy Lee’s productivity method utilizes many of the concepts I have written about previously.  Here’s what makes it so effective:

It’s simple enough to actually work. The primary critique of methods like this one is that they are too basic. They don’t account for all of the complexities and nuances of life. What happens if an emergency pops up? What about using the latest technology to our fullest advantage? In my experience, complexity is often a weakness because it makes it harder to get back on track. Yes, emergencies and unexpected distractions will arise. Ignore them as much as possible, deal with them when you must, and get back to your prioritized to-do list as soon as possible. Use simple rules to guide complex behavior.

It forces you to make tough decisions. I don’t believe there is anything magical about Lee’s number of six important tasks per day. It could just as easily be five tasks per day. However, I do think there is something magical about imposing limits upon yourself. I find that the single best thing to do when you have too many ideas (or when you’re overwhelmed by everything you need to get done) is to prune your ideas and trim away everything that isn’t absolutely necessary. Constraints can make you better. Lee’s method is similar to Warren Buffett’s 25-5 Rule, which requires you to focus on just 5 critical tasks and ignore everything else. Basically, if you commit to nothing, you’ll be distracted by everything.

It removes the friction of starting. The biggest hurdle to finishing most tasks is starting them. (Getting off the couch can be tough, but once you actually start running it is much easier to finish your workout.) Lee’s method forces you to decide on your first task the night before you go to work. This strategy has been incredibly useful for me: as a writer, I can waste three or four hours debating what I should write about on a given day. If I decide the night before, however, I can wake up and start writing immediately. It’s simple, but it works. In the beginning, getting startedis just as important as succeeding at all.

It requires you to single-task. Modern society loves multi-tasking. The myth of multi-tasking is that being busy is synonymous with being better. The exact opposite is true. Having fewer priorities leads to better work. Study world-class experts in nearly any field—athletes, artists, scientists, teachers, CEOs—and you’ll discover one characteristic runs through all of them: focus. The reason is simple. You can’t be great at one task if you’re constantly dividing your time ten different ways. Mastery requires focus and consistency.

*http://clintoneday.com/set-your-own-salary/

Current in Entrepreneurship

Future of Work Are New Collar Jobs.

What is current in entrepreneurship?

And, Community Colleges will play the key role in training the workforce.  

Case in point is Delta Airlines use of Lansing Community College in Michigan to train aviation maintenance – LANSING, Mich., July 13, 2017 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — Lansing Community College (LCC) has been selected as one of 43 Aircraft Maintenance schools to partner with Delta Air Lines. LCC was selected from 177 Aviation Maintenance Programs across the United States and is the only community college in Michigan to offer this program.

Over 100 criteria were used in Delta’s selection process including equipment and facilities, level of hands-on-training, and quality of teaching. This new partnership establishes Delta as a resource for continuous improvement and will broaden access for LCC graduates to become the next generation of aviation maintenance professionals.

“By providing students from these top-notch schools real-world training and direct support from Delta, we have a unique opportunity to generate awareness and interest in a very promising and enriching aviation career,” said Joe McDermott, Delta’s managing director of Cabin Maintenance, Training and Support Services.

“This partnership is a great opportunity for our students and their careers,” said LCC President, Dr. Brent Knight. “As our program continues to evolve, Delta will play a role in shaping our training to anticipate and meet the needs of the industry. To have a partner as well-renowned globally as Delta Air Lines is very powerful for our students and our community.”

LCC’s program is one of the most affordable in the nation. Graduates who attain FAA licensure as Aircraft and Powerplant Mechanics can earn a starting salary of up to $50,000.

“This is a significant achievement for our students, faculty and program,” said Mark Bathurst, director of LCC’s Aviation Program. “We are pleased Delta recognized the opportunities offered to our students and anticipate a highly productive relationship with them for years to come.”

New collar students –

So long white collar and blue collar. Now it’s all about the “new collar” job. In the current technological economy, where factories and production plants are closed or workers are replaced by computers, those computers need to be maintained and programmed. Enter “new collar” jobs — positions that require some specialized education (typically in a technical field), but not a four-year college degree.

And some companies have become so desperate for the right worker, they have started or invested in job training programs of their own, partnering with schools to equip students with the exact skills they will need to get a job, and then to do the job right.

So long white collar and blue collar. Now it’s all about the “new collar” job. In the current technological economy, where factories and production plants are closed or workers are replaced by computers, those computers need to be maintained and programmed. Enter “new collar” jobs — positions that require some specialized education (typically in a technical field), but not a four-year college degree.

And some companies have become so desperate for the right worker, they have started or invested in job training programs of their own, partnering with schools to equip students with the exact skills they will need to get a job, and then to do the job right.

Current in Entrepreneurship

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Role of Entrepreneurship in Ending Poverty and Homelessness.

What is current in entrepreneurship?
Social Entrepreneurs

Javits says social entrepreneurs are flexible. “By developing new models that cut across and blend the assets of various sectors without being stuck in orthodoxies about what each sector can or should do, social entrepreneurship opens up new possibilities to solve stubborn, seemingly insurmountable challenges.”

She also points out that social entrepreneurs think outside the box of either operating as a nonprofit surviving on donations and grants or being fully supported by revenues. Operating in that middle space creates opportunities for social entrepreneurs to leverage donor dollars with revenue generating services.

Effective social entrepreneurs relieve burdens by selling products that customers need to improve their lives. The profits from the sales create sustainable impact and provide returns to investors.

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Most shared album of entrepreneur stories on Facebook.

What is Current in Entrepreneurship?
Social Impact of Entrepreneurship

Today we hear a great deal about the economic impact of entrepreneurship. More companies are being started than ever before in American history; new and emerging companies are the source of all net new jobs in our economy; women are starting firms at far faster rates than men; 70% of high school juniors and seniors want to start their own companies when they are out of school; thirteen million Americans–25 million if you count part time entrepreneurs–are now running their own businesses from home; and so on.

But I don’t want to talk about the economic impact of entrepreneurship, as significant as it is. I want to focus instead on the social impact of entrepreneurship. Entrepreneurship is not just an economic phenomenon. It is a force that creates social value and a resource for community development.

In “Building Community,” medal of freedom winner John Gardner presents an insightful examination of the importance of community and a provocative analysis of the need that individuals have for identification with and empowerment within the communities in which they live. He emphasizes that “Where community exists it confers upon its members identity, a sense of belonging, a measure of security.” I am convinced that entrepreneurship can help confer identity, belonging and security not only on those who elect to start and grow enterprises, but also on those who join them in that effort and on the wider environment in which they operate.

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Top Franchises You Can Launch for Less Than $50,000.

What is Current in Entrepreneurship?
Home-based and mobile franchises

Business ownership doesn’t have to be super-expensive. Sure, some franchises cost thousands–even millions–of dollars to start. But a growing number of franchisors are coming up with homebased and mobile options, as well as new technologies, to help keep costs down for franchisees. Below, you’ll find Entrepreneur ‘s Top Low-Cost Franchises, 97 businesses that can each be started for less than $50,000.

These companies are listed based on their ranking in Entrepreneur‘s 2013 Franchise 500®, which is determined using objective, quantifiable criteria, including system size, growth and financial strength and stability. This listing is not intended as a recommendation of any particular company, but merely as a starting point for your own research. Always make sure you know what you’re investing in by reading a company’s legal documents, consulting with an attorney and an accountant and talking to franchisees.

Here are the current top 5 and their cost:

Startup Professor Ed Roberts from MIT Sloan School.

 

Ed Roberts started the scholarly study of startups. Learn from this brilliant academic pioneer and seasoned investor in Sohu.com and HubSpot about the keys to success in founding a tech company. Along the way you will be entertained and charmed by his most engaging narrative style.

He grew up in working-class Chelsea, Massachusetts. At Chelsea High, he received preparation that would allow him to explore the academic delights offered by MIT’s curriculum.

Four MIT degrees later he was on the faculty at MIT’s Sloan School of Management studying the impact of NASA’s research on the economy. From there it was a short hop to founding the study of tech startups. He also co-founded successful companies, including Meditech. His course on entrepreneurship incubated Beijing’s Sohu.com and Boston’s HubSpot. Ed Roberts was an early investor in both.

The oft-cited result that companies founded by MIT alums generate revenues equivalent to the 10th largest economy in the world is one of the products of his scholarship. He also delves into his work on the optimal composition of founding teams. Among the many topics covered in this bravura interview are:

  • Ed Roberts Bio
  • High School in Working-class Town of Chelsea Thoroughly Prepared Ed Roberts for Success at MIT
  • Sound Preparation from Chelsea High Allowed Ed Roberts to Explore the MIT Curriculum
  • Ed Roberts Meets Jay Forrester, Co-inventor of the Core Memory and Founder of System Dynamics
  • Research into Entrepreneurship Springs from NASA Project to Measure Impact of Its Technology
  • Ed Roberts Starts His First Company, Pugh-Roberts Associates
  • MIT Faculty Form Consulting Firms, MIT Grads Form Product Companies
  • Ed Roberts Founds Meditech
  • Engineers Debate the Need for a Marketing Person on the Meditech Team – Hired the Only Marketing Person They Knew
  • Sal Daher’s Pitch for Listeners to Give Back by Reviewing the Podcast on iTunes and Telling Others About It
  • The Most Significant Results from Ed Roberts’ Research
  • It’s Important Not to Keep Your Idea Secret but to Talk to Many People About It
  • Eric von Hippel & User Innovation
  • Ideas Are Overvalued – Person Who Has It Gets Too Much Credit – Pivots Are the Norm – Nobody Remembers All the Pivots – Example: Founders of HubSpot

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