Author Archives: C. DAY

Booth School Atlanta Host CEO of Career Builder

Last night your editor had the pleasure of meeting and interviewing Matt Feguson, guest speaker at the Atlanta chapter of the Univ of Chicago’s Booth Business School.  His easy manner and clear command of the Internet of Things (loT) was insightful.

Matt is co-author of “The Talent Equation.” An award-winning leader who has always challenged the status quo, Ferguson took CareerBuilder to the No. 1 position in online recruitment within five years. Under his direction, CareerBuilder has evolved into a global, end-to-end human capital solutions company that outperforms competitors in both technology innovation and revenue. Using bold strategies, Ferguson spearheaded CareerBuilder’s transformation from a recruitment giant to a powerhouse in both pre-hire and post-hire solutions. He introduced a new vision for advertising, software and services that has changed the way companies acquire and manage talent.

Our interest was the McKinsey Research indicating a major workforce disruption coming soon through use of artificial intelligence to replace human labor.  Matt was more sanguine, and felt what does come will “wrap around” existing work and complement rather than replace existing jobs.  Interesting enough, Matt worked early in his career for McKinsey, a fact reflected in his vision of the topic.  A graduate of the Northwestern law school, Ferguson made light of having attended Chicago’s “other school” (v. Booth).

Career Builder (CB) provides a wide range of hiring services including background checks, software sales, teaching systems, data analytics re- and up-skilling, and, yes, artificial intelligence (having just acquired an Amsterdam purveyor).  Some facts -the three most important criteria to new hires in order are job location, its pay, and the length of their commute.  Of CB applications, 60% come in via mobile phone whereas just last year it was 40%.  33% have a 4-year college degree, 67% do not, and 43% of those starting college do not complete studies within 6 years.

Matt sees the future of internet usage as compressed going forward, fewer Gig workers and fewer  employees that 10 years ago, and, to our regret, noted less entrepreneurship today than ever before.  At time when entrepreneurship can be a partial solution for workforce displacement by robotics and artificial intelligence, the latter is concerning.  The editor feels there has never been a more important time for basic, widespread training for entrepreneurship.  It will become, in our opinion, a survival skill needed to fill the space when displaced workers are looking for new jobs.  They will in essence do best by creating their own jobs.

Ferguson saw marketing as an area of opportunity through defining markets more narrowly and targeting good and services closer to the customer.  He feels big Tech will serve all us better by following the European model of restraints and definition.  Employees need to become life-long learners.  College degrees by themselves will no longer earn more salary, but need training in  specific niche skills.  Post secondary schools should funnel students into specialties that fit outcomes individual seek.  To saddle students with large debt and not result in a skilled outcome at the end (sociology, psychology majors were mentioned) won’t work in the future.  Matt cited the work of Mitch Daniels after service as Indiana governor while President of the University of Indiana as a great example of alignment studies to outcomes.

Per Ferguson the future is quite good for jobs.  There is demand for highly skilled labor, and the best fields for study are tech and finance.  Sales and marketing will always be needed.  Advertising should be targeted to match a business’ inventory.  Artificial intelligence (AI) can help take bias out of employment positions.  All in all, Matt’s address was hopeful.  Clearly, Career Builder has an enlightened leader at the top, who will stay current to employment changes and technological improvements. .

How To Be Taken Seriously As a Young Entrepreneur

Cory Nieves, founder of Mr. Cory’s Cookies, an e-commerce and wholesale cookie business based in Englewood, New Jersey, counts big customers like Aetna, Viacom, and Williams-Sonoma among his customer base. But, sometimes, his customers are a little taken aback when he arrives to meet with them. So his mom starts the conversation, and then he takes over once they’re comfortable. Bringing a parent to meetings would likely backfire for most young business founders, but Nieves just turned 14 years old.

Nieves started his business in 2010 at the age of 6 with the goal of buying his mother a car. Since then, the company has expanded from him selling cookies in the neighborhood to a growing and profitable enterprise. He’s appeared on Ellen(who gave his mother a car), and Marcus Lemonis, star of CNBC’s The Profit, has invested in his business.

The issue of being taken seriously is real for young entrepreneurs (even those over 18), says Callum Negus-Fancey, founder of Verve, a word-of-mouth marketing company founded in the U.K. with U.S. headquarters in Los Angeles. Negus-Fancey launched his first business when he was 17, which later grew into Verve. Although the company now has clients like Ticketmaster and Eventbrite, he struggled with being taken seriously in the early days.

If you’re a late millennial or generation Z entrepreneur, here are some smart strategies to help you get the respect you deserve. Before Nieves meets with a new client, he gets online and does some homework. He looks up the school they went to, learns about their business background, and looks for other items that may be interesting conversation starters. “I tell them all the things that I’ve looked up and read about them. And there’re really surprised, they’re amazed, like ‘How did you know about this? My employees don’t even know about this,’” he says. That lays the foundation for a business relationship because they see he’s interested and has taken the time to learn about the other person, he says.

Similarly, do some research about the client and their goals, says tech entrepreneur Anthony Frasier, entrepreneur-in-residence of Newark Venture Partners, a Newark, New Jersey-based fund backed by Audible/Amazon, and author of Don’t Dumb Down Your Greatness: A Young Entrepreneur’s Guide to Thinking & Being Great. Read the company’s website and recent news releases. Find recent media reports about the company and work on discerning what their goals, priorities, and challenges are. If you’re targeting publicly traded companies, you may find useful information in their quarterly reports and investor relations materials, he says. These are all relatively basic sales tactics, but if you haven’t been taught to look in these places, you may overlook rich sources of information that can help you solve a challenge or meet a need the company has, he adds.

Having a great idea is one thing, but being able to build a viable business based on it is another, Frasier says. Too often, young entrepreneurs fall in love with an idea without doing the due diligence necessary to ensure it can be built into a profitable enterprise. “A lot of times when I was young, I would come to people, ‘I’ve got this great idea,’ and they just never took me seriously,” he says. Once he began writing down his research into a plan that showed it could be a viable business, others began treating him as a serious professional, he says.

So, write a business planor, at the very least, get familiar with the market for your product or service, as well as production, delivery, pricing and distribution mechanisms and strategies that you’ll need to run your business. When you know well how your business will operate and grow, it’s tough to not take you seriously, Frasier says.

Starting a business is hard work, but it doesn’t always have to be all-consuming, Frasier says. As you build your business, cultivate positive, professional habits that will help you stay healthy and perform well. Taking care of yourself, developing a healthy routine, getting enough rest and exercise, and establishing other healthy routines will all benefit your business, he says. Hustle is important, but not at the expense of your health and creativity, he says.

“Once you get into a habit, creating those positive habits, then you’ll start to change everything else about how you work in your business. I usually try to teach entrepreneurs to build themselves up personally and watch how their business builds up,” he says.

It’s never too soon to start growing your network, and doing so can help you overcome some of the challenges of inexperience, says leadership coach Cheri B. Torres, author of Conversations Worth Having: Using Appreciative Inquiry to Fuel Productive and Meaningful Engagement. “It never hurts to make connections with those key people if it’s possible and appropriate ahead of time,” she says. So work on meeting people who will help your business or who can teach you something.

Frasier delivers a big caveat, though: Give before you ask. He says that he developed three habits when he was first starting out that helped him get taken more seriously. In addition to having a well-laid-out plan for his business and becoming an authority in his area, he would make connections between people who could help each other and find other ways to be useful. “I think a lot of young entrepreneurs, they take before they give. They always come with their hands out and never really come with value,” he says. Find ways to make yourself valuable to the people in your network, and they’ll be motivated to help you, too.

Starting a business is hard work, but it doesn’t always have to be all-consuming, Frasier says. As you build your business, cultivate positive, professional habits that will help you stay healthy and perform well. Taking care of yourself, developing a healthy routine, getting enough rest and exercise, and establishing other healthy routines will all benefit your business, he says. Hustle is important, but not at the expense of your health and creativity, he says.

“Once you get into a habit, creating those positive habits, then you’ll start to change everything else about how you work in your business. I usually try to teach entrepreneurs to build themselves up personally and watch how their business builds up,” he says.

It’s never too soon to start growing your network, and doing so can help you overcome some of the challenges of inexperience, says leadership coach Cheri B. Torres, author of Conversations Worth Having: Using Appreciative Inquiry to Fuel Productive and Meaningful Engagement. “It never hurts to make connections with those key people if it’s possible and appropriate ahead of time,” she says. So work on meeting people who will help your business or who can teach you something.

Frasier delivers a big caveat, though: Give before you ask. He says that he developed three habits when he was first starting out that helped him get taken more seriously. In addition to having a well-laid-out plan for his business and becoming an authority in his area, he would make connections between people who could help each other and find other ways to be useful. “I think a lot of young entrepreneurs, they take before they give. They always come with their hands out and never really come with value,” he says. Find ways to make yourself valuable to the people in your network, and they’ll be motivated to help you, too.

Sometimes young entrepreneurs expect people to not take them seriously and act preemptively defensive or like they know everything. That’s a mistake, Negus-Fancey says. Instead, become a sponge and try to learn as much as possible. Hire people who are more expert than you in certain areas. When you show a willingness to be humble and learn, and you’re also passionate and surrounding yourself with the best people, that’s a winning combination, especially for investors, he says.

When you’re first starting out in your business, you’re going to experience rejection or hardships along the way. Cultivating resilienceis essential for surviving over the long haul, Negus-Fancey says. If one approach doesn’t work out, try another. Don’t take rejection personally. And keep learning.

Most of all, keep believing in yourself, Nieves says. “People, sometimes they’ll get a little mean and stuff, and then you have to just shake it off. Don’t take it to heart, and always do research,” he says.

 Ref: https://www.fastcompany.com/40575438/how-you-can-get-people-to-take-you-seriously-as-a-young-entrepreneur, written by Gwen Moran, co-author of The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Business Plans(Alpha, 2010), and several other .

Business Tips for Veterans, 6/21/18 #SBAchat.

https://www.sba.gov/blogs/twitter-chat-how-start-and-grow-business-veteran-entrepreneurs?leavingSBA=https://na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fknowyourmilitary.osd.mil%2F&data=02|01||ec3cd5d7d461458653d908d5cbe30697|3c89fd8a7f684667aa1541ebf2208961|1|0|636639098281459715&sdata=auqS0Ppm0kN7nPVITgxuuO7%2BMGrlf%2BYBbMsTCoM8it4%3D&reserved=0

Two Dutch Students Research U. S. Entrepreneurship

 

With blessings from their business professsor, Koen Nijland and Kervin Krommendijk flew from Amsterdam to Los Angeles April 20, 2018, and connected with colleague Mike Crimshaw, Ex Dir of the Entrepreneurial Institute, College of Business at Cal State Dominguez Hills to research American entrepreneurs. “Mr. Grimshaw made sure that we got plugged into all levels of communities in LA to get a full on experience of America. He made sure we went to a political event, venturing summit, Disneyland, improv training at a Goodwill store, lots of incubator and accelerator programs, local restaurants and even some lectures at the university.” As an active participant in Enactus, Mike has readily responded to an email for assistance.

Their purpose is to survey American entrepreneurs “to find out what drives them to start a business and what drives their success.” Koen is focused on the ecosystem culture, innovation, and applying Saras Sarasvathy’s Effectuation to startups. Kervin, on the other hand, is interested in the cognitive knowledge, the passion of U. S. entrepreneurs; cognitive knowledge refers to one’s conscious understanding of matters as they relate to people, tasks, and strategy. What’s so extraordinary is the creativity these two sons of the Netherlands have used to put this summer tour together. First and foremost, it is digital. They use the internet for information on companies, contacts, and data. They use a cell phone for geographic (GPS) movement, Uber for transportation (as well as public plus a rare car rental), and AirBnB for housing. All food is cooked in rooms to keep within a tight budget, and most plans are adjusted (if you will “iterated”) on the fly.

In their own words from their diary, “at the innovation incubator at Cal State DH we met terrific social start-ups worth mentioning. Jason from Closedeyesopenheart has a start-up that focuses on solving the problem of homeless in LA. This cause that really caught our eye because we noticed what a serious problem it is in the city. During one meeting, we had the opportunity to gain insight into the challenges a startup entrepreneur encounters. One issue was building the network required to collect needed resources. We compared the problem to our first weeks in America; we had no network and had to grow our connections to contact entrepreneurs.

At new venture summit of the University of Southern California we glimpsed a different kind of start-up. Docbot, an innovation driven start-up, is a good example of a company that offers a strong solution to the real life problem, health care quality. Their goal is to become a leading provider of real-time artificial intelligence for medical procedures such as colonoscopies when immediate feedback improves patient outcomes. We also noticed much bigger firms asked for a least half a million in funding and seemed to have a working product with a proven value. Another stand-out observation is the development of a start-up pitch by entrepreneurs. We saw some pitch perfect, two minute talks at the venturing summit, and then contrasted them with a million cups event. The latter are in an earlier stage of development and still working toward key aspects of their business to pitch. A typicial meeting had two separate entrepreneurs pitch their start-up “ask”. An entrepreneur asks the audience of entrepreneurs for feedback about a specific part of their business and pitch. One of the most remarkeable things that we’ve experienced in America is a fantastic entrepreneurial community where everybody tries to help each other. Events like the “Get Started Orange County” is a good example of a competition that is also an opportunity for entrepreneurs to grow their network. The winner of this competition was an impressive, energetic woman who discovered a material to make earthquake resistent buildings accessible to everyone saving tons of money (called METAseismic).

Besides working on data collection we have also taken two road trips. The first was a visit to Sequoia and Yosemite National Parks, San Fransisco and Big Sur. Our second trip was a visit to Death Valley, Las Vegas, Zion and Bryce Canyon National Parks, and the Grand Canyon. After seeing all these magnificent sites, we had to acknowledge why Americans have good reason to be proud.”

Koen and Kervin have written a survey to determine if a person is wired to be an entrepreneur. Everyone is encouraged to connect with them on Linked In at https://www.linkedin.com/in/koen-nijland-3b67a968/ or https://www.linkedin.com/in/kervin-krommendijk-323268162/ and take the survey. The first 50 respondents are eligible to win a $50 Amazon gift card. After the end of the trip (Boston), Koen and Kervin will compose a report about factors that drive entrepreneurship and entrepreneurship success in the U. S. Koen will explain how cultural influences and innovation impact new ventures while Kervin investigates how passion and cognitive style drive success. Your editor and many others from entrepreneurship have been enriched and enjoyed meeting these special, young men from Holland. These guys ‘Van een vlieg een olifant maken’ (made an elephant out of a fly).

App Created by Gonzaga Grads Takes You to a Mystery Restaurant.

SPOKANE, Wash. — A new app created by Gonzaga grads could settle an age-old dinner debate: What’s for dinner?

“I take my girlfriend out on a Friday night, we just use the WildRide App. That’s basically how date night goes down,” Wildride App co-owner Cody Lippert said.

Lippert and Chloe Sabo are two of five Gonzaga graduates that created the “WildRide” app. It is the product of a class assignment, but the idea came from just two words.

“One of our co-founders got the words ‘bar’ and ‘roulette’. So, we put them together and came up with how can we make this work and we realized there’s a need for the decision making in finding a restaurant. So, we wanted to provide for that need,” Sabo said.

It is a free app you can download on Apple store or Google play. It works in any city with any restaurant listed on Yelp. The app will take you to a mystery bar or restaurant that’s within a 15-mile radius of your current location.

https://www.krem.com/article/news/local/spokane-county/app-created-by-gonzaga-grads-takes-you-to-a-mystery-restaurant/293-562087188

The Gonzaga entrepreneurship program is chaired by Dr. Toddy Finkle, a pioneer innovator- https://www.gonzaga.edu/academics/faculty-listing/detail/finkle.

Veterans Florida Winners 2018.

 

 

#Veterans#Entrepreneurship
2018 Veterans Florida Statewide Pitch Competition
“Vetrepreneur Battle of the Pitches” at SOFWERX. Our Hillsborough Community College Veterans Florida graduates Adam Luell, Founder of Axon Motor Company came in first place winning $10,000 and our other rock star entrepreneur Felicia Pecora , Founder of the Doer Academy came in third place winning $2,500. Us HCC team members are very PROUD. Veterans DO make outstanding entrepreneurs!

The Veterans Florida Entrepreneurship Program is in it 4th year under a State of Florida grant for any vets or active duty military within the state.  Andy Gold,  Beth Kerly, Greta Kishbaugh, and me have instructed a bunch of creative and persistent vets over the years.  This year we took the state competition against the other 6 universities participating. Kudos to Adam and Felicia.

Veterans Florida Entrepreneurship Program

Importance of Entrepreneurship Now

The world economy faces a massive disruption of labor.  Jobs are going to machines at an alarming rate, and ramifications will alter everything we know  about work. Three forces have been at work since 1990, but will soon go to warp speed.  First is the Gig Economy, which is an environment in which temporary positions are common and organizations contract with independent workers. A study by Intuit predicted that by 2020, 40 percent of American workers would be independent contractors.

Second is the automation of anything that is repetitive and can be replaced by robotics; most automobiles are now made by robots.  Third is the combination of Artificial Intelligence and Big Data. Artificial intelligence (AI) makes it possible for machines to learn from experience, adjust to new inputs and perform human-like tasks.  Deep learning is a type of machine learning that trains a computer to perform human-like tasks, such as recognizing speech, identifying images or making predictions.

Because Big Data has been growing expodentially, AI and deep learning have much to work from.  In 2013 SINTEF estimated that 90% of all information in the world had been created in the prior two years.  Lots of data is exactly what machines need in order to learn to learn.  Google’s DeepMind AI has learned how to read and comprehend what it reads through thousands of annotated news articles.

McKinsey research says that up to one-third of U. S. workers and 800 million globally could be displaced by 2030.  They recommend businesses and policymakers act now to keep people employed.  The single most impactful solution is to empower one and all with entrepreneurship whose innovative and creative skills can allow laborers to transit to self-employment (or to thrive as a freelancer in the Gig Economy).

 

The Answer Is Entrepreneurship

Here is a startling fact -jobs are going to machines at an alarming rate.   Consequences are in motion to alter everything we take for granted about our work and the ways in which we humans exist. The world has already gone from linear to parabolic.  By 2011 Watson, IBM’s artificial intelligence, question and answer computer, was capable of beating Jeopardy champions Ken Jennings and Brad Rutter.  But, a new class of machine known as “deep learning” has crossed us over to computers thinking faster and better than humans.  Advances in technology are now so powerful we can expect to see a lot more artificial intelligence (AI) soon.

A Chinese board game Go’s undisputed, five time champion Lee Se-dol, the world’s best living Go player recently dueled a computer.  China’s top players predicted Lee would not lose a single game, but Lee went on to lose all but one of five match games.  Such a feat is incredible.  Go is a super, ultra, mega chess game. AI has surpassed specific tasks, and can now learn collective behavior using algorithms.

Because of “deep learning”, voice recognition is more accurate and powerful now.  Voice interfaces are being added to more apps, which now have smart or cognitive capabilities.  AI learns from consumers consumption and provides real, valuable recommendations about behavior to target markets automatically.  If this change sounds exaggerated, step back and look at what computer technology has been doing to employment so far:

Computer technology is already eating jobs and has been since 1990.  Work can be divided into four types:  routine and nonroutine, cognitive and manual.  Routine work is the same day in and day out, while nonroutine varies.  Within these two varieties, it is the work that requries mostly our brains (cognitive) and the work that requires mostly our bodies (manual).  All four once saw growth, but routine stagnated in 1990.  This happened because routine labor is easiest for technology to replace.  Rules can be written for work that doesn’t change and then turned over to machines.

Unfortunately, it is the same routine work that once formed the American middle class.  Henry Ford transformed routine manual work by paying people middle class wages to perform it. Routine cognitive work that once filled US office spaces.  Many of the latter jobs are increasingly unavailable.  Only two kinds of jobs are left, the ones that require so little thought we pay people little to do them, and jobs that required so much thought we pay people well to do them.  Two engines out of four will keep the plane flying, but what happens when the two remaining engines fail?  The advancing fields of robotics and AI represent those final two engines because, for the first time, we are successfully teaching machines to learn.

At the same time Big Data is growing expodentially.  In 2013 SINTEF estimated that 90% of all information in the world had been created in the prior two years.  By 2015 every minute we were liking 4.2 million things on Facebook, uploading 300 hours of video to YouTube, and sending 350,000 tweets.  Lots of data is exactly what machines need in order to learn to learn.  The combinatioin of deep learning and big data has resulted in astounding accomplishments just in the past year.  Google’s DeepMind AI has learned how to read and comprehend what it reads through thousands of annotated news articles.  DeepMind has also taught itself to play dozens of Atari 2600 video games better than humans.

Anytime now is the answer in the 21st century for any question involving something new machines can do better than human, and wrapping our heads around the transformation of the world’s workforce is very difficult.  One thing certain is droves of workers will be displaced and soon.  If just the truck drives in the US were replaced by driveless trucks, 3.5 million people would be out of work.  We need to recognized what it means for exponentila technological change to enter the labor market for nonroutine jobs for the first time ever. Machines that can learn mean nothing humans do as a job is uniquely safe anymore.  From hamburgers to healthcare, machines can be created to successfully perform tasks with no need or less need for humans, and at lower costs than humans.

One more example, and we’ll address the known solution for the impending displaced workers.  Amelia is one AI being beta-tested by companies.  Created by IPsoft, she has learned how to perform the work of call center employees.  She can learn in seconds what takes us months, and she can do it in 20 languages. By learning more over time, she successfully handled one of every ten calls in the first week, but by the end of the second month, she could resolve six of ten calls.

The hope of workforce labor and economic growth as a counter force to this major transformation is entrepreneurship, the creation of cognitive, innovation designing better companies and countless new startups.  Small business is the backbone of our economy.  Successful entrepreneurs are naturally competitive, think outside the box, and see through easy answers to how an industry can benefit from a fresh take. The SBA said in 2012 small busineses created 64% of the new jobs in the previous decade:

  1. New businesses challenge the existing market.
  2. Market disruption causes new job fields to open.
  3. Small businesses are more flexible to change.
  4. Competition pushes companies to streamline.
  5. Their ideas create new products and services.
  6. Entrepreneurship historically turns bad economies.
  7. Managed economies (China) encourage it as crucial.
  8. Experience has proved that entrepreneurship can be taught.
  9. Entrepreneurship flourishes in US capitalism and freedoms.
  10. Self-employed are passionate, willing to work harder.
  11. Business creation is job creation.
  12. Entrepreneurs also create, improve social change.

Because entrepreneurship is a way of thinking (the entrepreneurial mindset), it is learned over time and by experience. Introducing the power to choose, opportunity recognition, action on ideas, pursuit of knowledge, wealth creation, building a brand, creating community, and the power of persistence should be inserted into early education.  In Georgia there is a program, the International Entrepreneurship Institute’s Real Ledge, that trains K12 teachers of all grades to introduce entrepreneurial thinking and experiential exercises to curriculum.

High school students have been dramatically turned from failure to success in one or two years by”catching the entreprenship bug”.  Two national programs of note, the NFTE, Network for Teaching Entrepreneurship, and YEA, Youth Entrepreneurship Academy, use mentorship and project competitions to reward startup ideas.  Entrepreneurship teaches human success, how to evaluate and identify beliefs and assumptions, problem solving, oral and written communication, teamwork, and community engagement.

Entrepreneur students come out critical thinkers able to validate their business ideas through inquiry and analysis.  Even mature and experienced works, who make changes in the Gig Economy, are far better prepared by entrepreneurship skills.  Due to shifts from an industrial to a knowledge economy, temporary positions are common and organizations contract with independent works for short-term engagements.  These workers need skills to survive self-employed even now ahead of the impending loss of routine labor.  They will need to understand entrepreneurship to  thrive.

It is past time to offer exposure to entrepreneurial thinking in K12 schools from coast-to-coast, make one year of entrepreneurship education mandatory in all community colleges and universities, and fund workforce development centers with state-of-the-art evidenced-based (aka lean) entrepreneurship training.  There is still time to save the giantic freight train headed straight at routine and cognitive labor if we wake-up now and accept entrepreneurship as the answer.

McKinsey research say that up to one-third of U. S. workers -and 800 million globally- could be displaced by 2030.  The researchers found that “60 percent of occupations have at least 30 percent of constituent work activities that could be automated.”  “Income polarization could continue in the United States and other advanced economies,” they added.  McKinsey suggests that governments can help retrain workers or supplement income as people adjust.  “To help transition to a future with increased automation, businesses and policymakers will need to act to keep people employed,” suggests the McKinsey research. We know that action is to embrace  entrepreneurship training as the best solution to massive unemployment.

Clinton E. Day is an entrepreneurship adjunct professor and author, more on website    http://clintoneday.com.
Special thanks to Scott Santens, moderator of BasicIncome on Reddit, a fervent believer in basic income as a solution to the displacement, whose article made the deep learning argument. 

McKinsey research